Haibun Journey

At bustling Gare Saint Lazare is the train for home – boring diesel, no longer romantically clouded in steam, when you would have been dressed formally for travelling with a hat and white gloves picking up every speck of coal dust.

Now you are casual in jeans and a sweater which would have been more convenient then.  Instead of a porter to do your bidding you trail your suitcase on wheels behind you, anxiously seeking your place.  Sounds intensify; people are rushing; doors are slamming; whistles shriek.  No time for nostalgic musing: hurl yourself in, flop down in your seat and relax. Jerk, clank, trundle clatter between encroaching city blocks.  Settle to a smoother rhythm. Calmly now, we’re on our way.

Homeward happily
through blooming apple orchards ─
the fragrance of Spring

 

For dVerse Haibun Monday where the illustration was Monet’s painting of Gare Saint Lazare in Paris, the terminus for Basse Normandie, where I live. When I was studying for my online degree that station was associated in my mind with travel to tutorials and exams.

About https://vivinfrance.wordpress.com

All poetry, prose and pictures posted here, except where otherwise stated, is my own, and may only be used elsewhere with my expressed permission. Please don't be inhibited from correcting my bloopers and making suggestions: Most of what I post here is instant, ill-considered and off-the-cuff, in serious need of editing.
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31 Responses to Haibun Journey

  1. The way i see poeTry
    iS a thousAnd or more
    poetic responses to
    even one poem..
    iN trading suits
    and formal
    ways for introspection
    free my friend… on tRains
    of Love.. that never speed.. away..:)

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Self service culture..
    human touch fleeting..
    Flowers bloom..
    Valleys green..
    Mountains high…

    Nature touches..
    human
    gloves grow colder..:)

    Liked by 1 person

  3. restlessjo says:

    Blooming apple orchards! Yay! 🙂 Doors slamming- we don’t hear that any more 😦 I like this piece, Viv.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Bodhirose says:

    I love the sweet, lighthearted haiku at the end. The heart is happy when heading home!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. My grandmother used to talk about taking the train. I wish I could have experienced it, too.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. whimsygizmo says:

    This sentence makes me infinitely happy:
    “Jerk, clank, trundle clatter between encroaching city blocks.”

    Liked by 1 person

  7. shanyns says:

    Oh this is so very nice.

    Like

  8. kanzensakura says:

    Home again, smell of the apple orchards….such a nice write this is – I remember when one wore hats, gloves, ties to travel. This takes me back. The hustle bustle of travel and that jewel of a haiku at the end that makes the fragrant peace…

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Sanaa Rizvi says:

    Beautiful… especially adore the haibun at the end 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Nato says:

    Love the clatter, clank and jerks. Gave me quite a visual of the train. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  11. How it was vs. how it is now. But it seems you still have the travel “bug”. Lovely prose and haiku!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Great to get the contemporary details, in contrast to the historical – and what a lovely contrast of a different kind in the haiku.

    Like

  13. I love how you express that period of train travel. Bygone dreams for a fan of big steam! Thank you, Vivienne!

    Like

  14. Bryan Ens says:

    Your language evokes the hustle rush, and even panic of the train station, but by the end…on the journey at last, you bring about a sense of peace and contentment. And then your haiku brings that sense of peace to an even deeper level.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. katechiconi says:

    Travel is so much more commonplace now. Comfort is important, but so is a sense of occasion, and back then, it was still ‘a thing’ to get on a train and travel. I can just, just remember some of the last steam trains that ran from Waterloo; as a four year old, I was taken in the car to the station to collect my father from his homeward train after a day’s work in the City. That smell of the steam and the train is embedded in my earliest memories.

    Like

  16. catterel says:

    My kids have asked me more than once: WHY did we get dressed up to travel??

    Like

  17. kim881 says:

    Yes, there’s nothing like going home.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. I love the contrast of the past and present but still some noises from the train.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. lynn__ says:

    Diesel and jeans aren’t as picturesque…but will still bring you home! I love your haiku 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  20. The times change, but our enjoyment of the trip home always seems to brighten the day. My commute involves New York City’s stinky rivers and other malodorous landscapes… Next time, I will close my eyes and think of “blooming apple orchards”. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  21. thotpurge says:

    That took me back to another time…formal clothes and steam engines! The world does seem more beautiful when one is headed home!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. I really enjoy train travel. Once you are on, and seated, life almost takes on a suspended state where all you have to do is sit and observe.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. I think it was the Gare St Lazare that I experienced to go to Brittany…it’s been a long while. In any case, you let me share the experience of train travel in France–I would love to repeat it.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Grace says:

    How lovely to come home ~ I take the trains everyday to work so the sounds & sensations of movements resonated with me ~ Good one Viv ~

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Glenn Buttkus says:

    Home again, home again-lovely reminiscence. The older I get I remember our NW in the 50’s before the population tripled, & the genuine blue highway road trips as Eisenhower built the interstates. It’s what makes us good poets.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Misky says:

    I want so very much to take a journey on the Flying Scotsman. Unfortunately, it’s sold out for the entire year. I love your train journey, Viv.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. I love how you brought in the change in attire for travel. When it would have been more convenient to dress comfortably, they most certainly did not. And now, you might even see someone in their pajamas on a flight, train, or bus. I also love your haiku that was connected and yet very much stood alone. Peace, Linda

    Liked by 1 person

  28. But still there is that beauty of traveling … Really love how that calm settles in, with views of orchards, there can’t be anything better than going home,

    Liked by 1 person

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