Panegyric to Rosie

Celebrating its 3 years of existence, the dVerse Poets Pub wants us to write an ode to a favourite poet.  Odes are not really my style An ode consists of strophe, of complex metrical structure, followed by an antistrophe, which mirrors the opening, and anepode, the final closing section of a different length and composed with a different metrical structure.  I hope I have understood this recipe.

 

Panegyric to Rosie

O poet lady with a magic touch, you inspired me.
Your poetry’s accessible, succinct and I admire you
Two indivisible poets: the late UA Fanthorpe –
through whose captivating poetry
I met the other half of the pair: RV  Bailey,
fell under her firm but kind spell as teacher and poet.
From her I learned to shrink my words to bare bones,
save readers the task of wading through waffle to find the germ.
Since she told me to shrink my poetry,
I did.

About https://vivinfrance.wordpress.com

All poetry, prose and pictures posted here, except where otherwise stated, is my own, and may only be used elsewhere with my expressed permission. Please don't be inhibited from correcting my bloopers and making suggestions: Most of what I post here is instant, ill-considered and off-the-cuff, in serious need of editing.
This entry was posted in formal poetry and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

22 Responses to Panegyric to Rosie

  1. Well done, Viv. I love it, especially the closing lines,.

    Like

  2. rmp says:

    very well done and I think quite succinct. it can be tough to strip away the excess, but an often worthwhile treat.

    Like

  3. Nara Malone says:

    I learned some lessons from your poem and picked up some names to research.

    Like

  4. This piece does well at honoring broadness and depth in a succinct, perfect way.

    Like

  5. It was a lesson well learned 🙂

    Like

  6. Gabriella says:

    I agree with your teacher, poetry should not feel like a hay stack where the reader needs to find the needle. I always enjoy poems I can understand easily understand. They speak to my heart.

    Like

  7. Sometimes it takes a longer poem to be effective in getting a meaning across…as long it it pertains to the original conception and premise and follows it all the way through 😉 Some are better condensed as well.
    ..like an appetizer 😉

    Like

  8. Linda says:

    I agree with shrinking any writing into a sweet, condensed morsel. I think it can help to deliver a message with more impact.

    Like

  9. Glenn Buttkus says:

    I guess you might say that my poems, unless otherwise directed by dVerse prompt, are of the panoramic variety. I never set out predisposed to make it so, but each poem seems to have a life of its own. One would like to think that they are not writing chaff, gobbly-gook, or bloatage, only containing a “germ” of point taken, wisdom, or wordsmithing–but of course the poet them self is not always as objective or critical of their own word whelping. Your point, or Rosie’s is well taken though–so in defense of longish poems, as Brian said, “I can write shorter ones if I want to.”.

    Like

  10. MarinaSofia says:

    Ha, I love the ending to your poem! An abrupt glottal stop. And yes, I do prefer brief poetry. Even if it doesn’t always come out like that when I write it…

    Like

  11. Mary says:

    Ah, Viv, I think you learned some good lessons. I am another who prefers to shrink my words rather than write something that readers have to struggle with. And likewise I prefer to read poems that I don’t have to struggle to find the point.

    Like

  12. Susan says:

    Fun! I love the honoring of a teacher with a poem that takes you into her lessons. Clever, positive and fun.

    Like

  13. kelly says:

    shrinking words to bare bones, yes, that is the essence of poetry. a lovely tribute!

    Like

  14. Lovely… I like how you say in brief all that needs to be said. My favorite bit:
    “I learned to shrink my words to bare bones”
    -HA

    Like

  15. I think the ability to write a tight poem speaks of a great command of words. Today I’ve also read lengthy poetry, with a panoramic vision. And I’ve written a few like that. I especially like that you gave tribute to your teacher.

    Like

  16. claudia says:

    shrinking the words can be a good thing…i need another two or three lessons on this…smiles….i admire poets that are able to shrink a whole image into a haiku…cool on how she influenced her writing

    Like

  17. opsimathpoet says:

    Lovely Viv – I think we all learned a lot from Rosie – she certainly changed things for me and I think of her with great fondness. Hope you are keeping well and enjoying life XX

    Like

  18. Oh yes – shrink poetry – booing it down to its core, good to go personal in your approach 😉

    Like

  19. brian miller says:

    its a good lesson…one i can do when i want…ha…i rather like the journey
    nice tribute to poets that changed the way you approach your own poetry
    i will have to look them up and give them a read….

    Like

I love it when you leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s