Infarctus–Wordle 110

……..…Layers compress in my heart
……………..connections yield to a range of fertile pressures
…..vessels shrink and close
…………………………………………….. life-anchor shifts

………………………………… scene fades                              

………………and all around is panic
someone
calls
for
atropine

Inside I am calm. I’ve heard it all before.

                                              I vaguely catch the repeated phrase
…………….“Stand clear: shocking.”
                 Whoomp, thump

current is cut
pause

………………………………………………..a tiny beam of life returns
……………………………..the fuzzy scene begins to re-appear

………………..a ring of smiling blue-clad faces
………tells me I am in the clear
again.

Today’s Wordle words were: heart connect yield close phrase beam current fertile anchor range shift layers   You’ll find a huge variety of interpretations of these words here  Also linked at dVerse for Open Link Night

About https://vivinfrance.wordpress.com

All poetry, prose and pictures posted here, except where otherwise stated, is my own, and may only be used elsewhere with my expressed permission. Please don't be inhibited from correcting my bloopers and making suggestions: Most of what I post here is instant, ill-considered and off-the-cuff, in serious need of editing.
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44 Responses to Infarctus–Wordle 110

  1. julespaige says:

    I believe you have accurately described what so many experience. In that transition time of wondering if one will be returning or just watching the scene play out… I like the visual as well.

    Stay healthy and thanks for your visit.

    Like

  2. Glad she’s okay! Wow!

    Like

  3. Tony Maude says:

    Wow VIv. This reads like an account of an out-of-body experience. All the details are there – and all perfectly described, but so calmly, which is such a contrast to the usual presentations of the subject.

    Like

  4. Teresa says:

    Chilling in it’s details.

    Like

  5. Pamela says:

    Viv, the way you wrote this adds to the impact of the situation. Vivid piece. Take care of yourself.

    Pamela ox

    Like

  6. It’s the details that make this narrative real for the reader – the atropine, the whump-thump, the current cut – a vivid experience that catches you and never lets go. Powerful.

    Like

  7. bostonpoetry says:

    Awesome poem. Seamless in weaving the words together coherently. -Mike

    Like

  8. Beth Winter says:

    Wow… You took the words and created our greatest fear in a poetic tale. Your presentation enhanced the progression. Well done.

    Like

  9. Mary says:

    Viv, you had my heart beating hard here! Intense indeed. You wordled your truth well.

    Like

  10. brian miller says:

    geez that is intense…what a vivid and scary moment there…almost out of body and back in…seeing what is going on around you even as the line flattens…hearing the voices…shivers…intense viv…

    Like

  11. Laurie Kolp says:

    Viv- This is intense… is it about you?

    Like

  12. This feels real to me–and the structure really lends to the quick intensity of the piece–great job!

    Like

  13. Sounds like a shocking experience, I soo love the fragmented writing and those beacons of details .. and now in the clear.

    Like

  14. Grateful that you are still here!

    Like

  15. colonialist says:

    A somewhat shocking interpretation! 🙂

    Like

  16. Lynda says:

    Powerful wording, Viv, and a little scary on the side.

    Like

  17. henna ink says:

    Oh yikes! How scary. I really like the visual presentation, the pauses created. This:

    “Whoomp, thump

    current is cut
    pause”

    … is my favorite.

    Like

  18. Oh my goodness, Viv…your fragmented style visually and vocally is such a fit for your topic. So scary. Well done on more than one level. So glad you’re here. ❤

    Like

  19. Viv, this is about as realistic an account – the blow-by-blow description – of a cardiac episode as I’ve ever read. My dad had one in his 50s and completely changed his lifestyle. He died at 81 – but he skiied (the “bunny slopes”) on his 80th birthday. Amy

    Like

  20. It’s spread out with a sense of chaos and yet there is this feeling of being above it. It feels very real. Great use of the words.

    Like

  21. Misky says:

    Made me shudder. I have a dicky ticker myself, but I’ve not stepped down that shocking path yet.

    Like

  22. Vivid and real. Glad you’re okay.

    Like

  23. whimsygizmo says:

    Oh, my word. This is amazing, Viv.

    Like

  24. kaykuala says:

    Beautiful flow and so smoothly, Viv! One is most happy of being cleared, certainly!

    Hank

    Like

  25. Veronica Roth says:

    Holy smokes Viv, I’m so glad you are here to tell the tale. Brilliant use of the words. 🙂

    Like

  26. Laurie Nichols says:

    Wow. I knew that it was your own experience that I was reading and it felt so intense but your voice was calm, which calmed me. Such a powerful poem.

    Like

  27. barbara_ says:

    Whew. Do, please, take care of your silly self.
    Need to pass this along to Jim. He’s always needing patient viewpoints for his students.

    Like

  28. annell4 says:

    Nicely done. And a joy to read!

    Like

  29. Nanka says:

    Heaved a sigh of relief when I reached mid way and loved the direction it took from there 😉 even literally!!

    Like

  30. The layout of your words added to the energy of your poem until I read “in the clear”!

    Like

  31. oldegg says:

    I hope I am out cold if that happens to me. I don’t want to hear them say “We have lost him”.

    Like

  32. One of your best, Viv. It’s like it happened to you… 😉

    Like

  33. Irene says:

    It is vivid. I like that there is calm in a crisis.

    Like

  34. 1sojournal says:

    Whew! Very vivid and incredibly real. Can see why you used the words in this fashion. Startling interpretation, Viv.

    Elizabeth
    http://soulsmusic.wordpress.com/2013/05/26/before-breaking-silence/

    Like

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